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Brain Stimulation Explained

Brain Stimulation Explained
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Brain stimulation is a neurosurgical procedure that involves implanting electrodes in a specific area of your brain.These electrodes produce electrical impulses which regulate abnormal impulses or affect certain chemicals and cells in the brain.The electrical signals also block signals from the brain that make the muscles tremble.The amount of brain stimulation is controlled by a pacemaker-like device called an impulse generator or IPG. It is placed under the skin of the upper chest (clavicle).A wire travelling under your skin connects this device to the electrodes in your brain.It is used in the treatment of Parkinson disease, essential tremors and Dystonia.

Alzeimers and forgetfullnessBrain stimulation involves a number of steps. First, an assessment of the patient is done. This will involve a review of the medical history of the patient and psychological assessment.The patient is then taken through CT or MRI scans to identify target area of the brain for placement of the electrodes.Once the target area has been identified, the permanent electrodes are now placed.The loose ends are then placed underneath the skin of the head.The incision is then closed with sutures. Anesthesia is used during the placement of the impulse generator in the chest and positioning of extension wires connecting electrodes to the impulse generator.After the operation, the patient may need additional physiotherapy and psychological support.It could take about four weeks before the simulators and medications are adjusted before the patient receives adequate symptom relief.The process however does not have many side effects.

Brain stimulation is very advantageous; It does not involve purposeful destruction of any part of the brain and, as a result, it has fewer complications compared to thalamotomy and pallid Oto my. In addition, it is adjustable.It can be changed as the patients’ disease change or if the patients’ response to the medication changes.It does not require further surgery to make it adjustable. Another advantage is that it is a safe procedure and can be turned off at any time if it causes excessive side effects. It also improves daily living tasks and quality of life.

Categories:   Brain Health, Happiness, Health, Mental Health, Preventive Measures, Treatments

Published by

Alex Glenn

Alex Glenn

Hey everyone, I'm Alex. I'm not a physician, and I don't have a masters degree. I just want to help people in the way I know how - using technology and relationships to make information more accessible. I founded Betteryears with the hope to fill a gap in the way brain health information is distributed and absorbed. Enjoy!